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In-Box Review
135
German Pz Crew Summer Set
German Pz Officer in Summer; German Pz Crew in Summer
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by: Rudi Richardson [ TAROK ]

Introduction

35101 – “German Panzer Crew Summer Set” is set of two 1/35th scale resin figures sculpted by Krisztián Bódi. The two Heer crewmen, both wearing items of camouflage clothing, are portrayed in shirt order and relaxed poses: the one seated; the other leaning casually. Released in April 2010, the box-art is painted by regular Alpine box-art painter Man-Jin Kim.

Both figures are also available individually as figures 35099 German Panzer Officer in Summer and 35100 German Panzer Crew in Summer.


35099 German Panzer Officer in Summer

35099 German Panzer Officer in Summer portrays a German Panzer Oberleutnant seated, legs crossed, reading a map (or document or newspaper depending on how the modeller chooses to represent the part). There is nothing specific that would identify the Officer with a particular late-war front although he wears garb not uncommon amongst German troops during the latter parts of the war (Italy and Southern France in particular): the combination of a privately tailored or field-made camouflage attire and general issue clothing.

The officer wears what at first glance appears to be a field-made camouflage M44 feldbluse, however I am inclined to think it a locally made pullover-style shirt. Most likely made of camouflage material, the shirt is worn with applied M1940 field-grey shoulder straps (the texture of the braided officer shoulder straps is barely visible). I would estimate there are two concealed buttons on the front vent which meets between the two breast patch pockets, sans pleats, each with a straight edged button down flap. A further curiosity is the seam which runs down the back of the shirt, as this is not a feature of either the standard issue shirts or the M44 field blouse. I may be grasping at straws in trying to identify the shirt, but it bears a certain resemblance to the Italian M1939 shirt which similarly featured two breast pockets and a two-button front vent down to mid-chest level. His shirt is adorned with a variety of awards.

In addition to the above shirt, the Panzer officer wears reed-green Panzer denim trousers, short lace-up ankle boots (Schnürschuhe), soft shell holster attached to what is most likely a brown leather officers belt and standard issue set of 6x30 binoculars finished in ordinance tan.

35099 German Panzer Officer in Summer is presented with two head gear options: the standard tanker black cloth version of the M1938 Feldmütze; and a camouflage visored field cap. The field cap, locally-made from tent section material, is made to resemble the M1940 Afrikamütze (or the rarely seen army summer cap) albeit without the false side flaps.


35100 German Panzer Crew in Summer

35100 German Panzer Crew in Summer portrays a German Panzer crewman, although with no visible insignia he could be either an enlisted or commissioned soldier, standing casually in shirt order with his left hand resting on an object (the box-artist has chosen to represent the object as being fuel drum, however this could easily be part of a vehicle or architecture). Like his counterpart, there is nothing specific that would associate this soldier with a particular late-war front, although he would not be out of place in France, Italy, the Balkans and perhaps even Russia.

The crewman wears a mouse-grey coloured shirt which was without breast pockets, had an attached collar, long sleeves which this tanker wears rolled, and was manufactured from a knitted wool like material. His camouflage trousers are field-made in Italian M1929 forest-pattern “telo mimetico” camouflage cloth. Interestingly, while they appear to resemble M1942 Panzer denims with an added second thigh pocket, these trousers seem to have integrated thigh pockets (i.e. not a patch pocket) as only the button down pocket flaps are visible. The trousers, closed at the ankle with a drawstring, are worn tucked into his lace-up boots. Around his neck hangs a pair of long range binoculars, possibly 7x56 or 10x50, while attached to an officers’ belt is a soft-shell holster.

The Panzer crewman is presented with the same two headgear options as his counterpart.


The Kit

The set, moulded in Alpine Miniatures’ traditional light grey coloured resin, comes in a kit form consisting of a total of twelve (12) pieces - six pieces for per figure. The kit is packaged in a small, clear acetate box with each figure’s parts inside its own small zip-lock bag. A small card displaying the painted set of figures, as well as the individual figures is supplied.

Figure 35099 German Panzer Officer in Summer consists of the following six (6) parts:

  • Full figure, excluding head left forearm and right foot;
  • Left forearm holding document;
  • Right foot wearing ankle boot;
  • Head wearing M1938 Feldmütze field cap;
  • Head wearing a camouflage visored field cap; and
  • Soft shell holster.

    Figure 35100 German Panzer Crew in Summer consists of the following six (6) parts:

  • Full figure, excluding head and arms;
  • Left and right arms;
  • Head wearing M1938 Feldmütze field cap;
  • Head wearing a camouflage visored field cap; and
  • Soft shell holster.


    The Figures

    As expected from Alpine Miniatures the figures are overall impeccably sculpted, with crisp and clean casting.

    The four heads are well-sculpted, and each face matches the other of the pair in terms of facial features – it is only the headgear that distinguishes the two heads. The faces are cleanly sculpted and well defined, with well-textured, unkempt hair noticeable from beneath the headgear. The headgear is well proportioned and nicely detailed. The casting blocks are positioned under the neck, so modellers can effortlessly remove these without fear of damaging any detail.

    The figures proper are well detailed and the summer theme is enhanced by open collars, rolled shirt sleeves, peaked caps and the loose fit and flow of the officer’s tailored shirt and his compatriot’s trousers. Folds gather realistically for the materials portrayed. All the finer details such as rank insignia, awards, belts, and the binoculars as well as pockets, button-fly fronts, are well detailed and very crisply and clearly cast. Recesses are provided for placement of the holsters, one above the left buttocks for figure 35099 and one on the left hip for figure 35100.

    The casting typically Alpine Miniatures: clean and crisp. That said, 35099 did feature a slight blemish on the left buttock, between the holster locator socket and centre trouser seam (which itself should not be mistaken for a casting line), as well as a fine casting seam down the rear left leg. Both of these slights are easily correctable with fine sanding paper or a sharp blade. As per normal the casting blocks under the feet and the pant seat of 35099 have been cut away and only a quick clean is required.

    The remaining parts, namely 35099’s left forearm and right boot, 35100’s arms, and the two holsters are, as with the rest of the figure, are well detailed and cast. 35099’s forearm and boot are supplied attached to the casting block, with the boot featuring some very fine detail: the hob-nailed sole. The casting blocks for 35100’s arms are located under the elbow and on the inner shoulder of the right and left arms respectively.


    Conclusion

    WWII German miniatures are certainly not a unique subject, but what distinguishes Alpine Miniatures’ figures from the rest is the manner in which Alpine, under the direction of owner Taesung Harmms, pick up on the very many nuances present in German uniformology. This figure set by Alpine Miniatures is another excellent example of the various aspects of the late war German uniform and the “mix and match” manner in which general issue and tailored, be it field or professionally, clothing was worn. Furthermore, this set has summer theme!

    For the painter, as with most WWII German subjects, there are a number of interesting ways in which these figures can be presented due to the selection of camouflage schemes or even simply revert to Feldgrau. With only minor modification either or both of these figures can be converted to Waffen-SS crewmen.

    Through the wonderful sculpting of Krisztián Bódi and the high quality casting of Alpine Miniatures modellers are presented with a really nice set of figures. Recommended.


    References

    The following references were used for this review:

  • Davis, Brian L. German Army Uniforms and Insignia, 1933-1945. 2nd ed. London: Military Book Society, 1973. Print.
  • de Lagarde, Jean. German Soldiers of WWII. Trans. Jean-Pierre Villaume and Alan McKay. Paris: Histoire & Collections, 2005. Print.
  • Thomas, Nigel, and Stephen Andrew. The German Army 1939-45 (5): Western Front 1943-45. Vol. 336. London: Osprey, 2000. Print. Men-at-Arms.


  • SUMMARY
    This figure set by Alpine Miniatures is another excellent example of the various aspects of the late war German uniform and the “mix and match” manner in which general issue and tailored, be it field or professionally, clothing was worn. Furthermore, this set has summer theme!
    Percentage Rating
    90%
      Scale: 1:35
      Mfg. ID: 35099; 35100; 35101
      PUBLISHED: Apr 26, 2011
      NATIONALITY: Germany
    NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
      THIS REVIEWER: 85.47%
      MAKER/PUBLISHER: 93.33%

    Our Thanks to Alpine Miniatures!
    This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.
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    About Rudi Richardson (Tarok)
    FROM: VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

    I'm a former Managing Editor of the Historicus Forma historical figure modelling website. While my modelling and history interests are diverse, my main figure modelling focus lies in Sci-Fi, Pop-Culture, Fantasy, Roman and WW2 German subjects. I'm a firm believer that armour and vehicles accessorise...

    Copyright ©2018 text by Rudi Richardson [ TAROK ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Historicus Forma or Silver Star Enterprises. All rights reserved.



    Comments

    Nice to see you back in business Rudi! Very good review and nice looking figures.
    APR 26, 2011 - 09:34 AM
    Thanks for publishing, Mario Thanks for your comments, Andrzej. Prior to this my last review was in September 2010 - hopefully it won't be another 7 months before my next
    APR 27, 2011 - 06:50 AM
    Krisztian did a really good job on these figures... Rudi, your reviews are always a very interesting read. I don't know much about WW2 gear but your style of writing makes spotting all the German equipment details sculpted on these figures very easy. Thanks mate, Mario
    APR 27, 2011 - 10:43 AM
    Aw shucks, thanks Mario (flattery will get you everywhere ). I just write the kind of review I'd like to read, and I enjoy the research - don't know if I've ever mentioned it but I generally spend several hours doing the review research, and I start fresh with each review.
    APR 28, 2011 - 04:50 AM
    That's why I think the reviews published here are the best on the net; really good "walkaround" photos with the detailed description of the equipment... I think it is definitely useful to know if the figure is accurately sculpted or not. Mario
    APR 28, 2011 - 06:12 AM
    We broke our quick reply box. Working on it. Until fixed go to topic to reply.
    Thanks.
       

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